Home News Human Rights Violations: UN Highlights Sri Lanka’s Drug Arrests

Human Rights Violations: UN Highlights Sri Lanka’s Drug Arrests

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Human Rights Violations: UN Highlights Sri Lanka’s Drug Arrests
Sri Lankan drug

Sri Lankan drug – The Assembled Countries (UN) has scrutinized the Sri Lankan police for their blundering approach in the continuous enemies of opiates crackdown, which has brought about the capture of thousands of individuals. The UN High Magistrate for Common freedoms, Volker Turk, has encouraged the Sri Lankan government to survey the activity and execute a rights-based way to deal with Sri Lanka drug control and treatment.

Central issues

•             In excess of 29,000 individuals have been captured between December 17, 2023, and January 15, 2024.

• Approximately 1,500 of those detained were placed in administrative detention while in the custody of the police, while 1,600 were required to attend drug rehabilitation centers.

Sri Lankan drug

•             Policing have been blamed for exposing suspects to unapproved assaults, inconsistent captures, abuse, public strip searches, and torment.

•             Almost 800kg of stash, including 340kg of weed and 70kg of heroin, have been seized during the activity.

Concerns and Recommendations The UN has expressed concern regarding the excessive use of force in law enforcement, which has resulted in numerous violations of human rights. Turk has encouraged the Sri Lankan government to survey the activity and carry out a rights-based way to deal with drug control and treatment. He underlined that maltreatment of medications and the variables that lead to it are most importantly general wellbeing and social issues, and individuals associated with selling or dealing drugs are qualified for compassionate treatment, with full regard for fair treatment and straightforward, fair preliminaries.

Sri Lanka Police’s Reaction

Notwithstanding worldwide worries, the Sri Lanka police have declared plans to send off another period of the medication bust activity, planning to capture 42,248 suspects and hold onto more stash. The police have protected their activities, expressing that the captures were made as a feature of the activity Yuktiya (the Sinhala word for “equity”).

In conclusion, the UN’s criticism of Sri Lanka drug anti-narcotics campaign highlights the need for a drug control and treatment strategy that is more human rights-based and more balanced. The UN’s concerns must be addressed by the Sri Lankan government and police, and they must ensure that their actions comply with international human rights standards.

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